Dating sites real or fake

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Too, several of these letters (the very first contact these supposed women had had with "Michael's" profile) included such implausibly forward statements as "Do you want to regard me as your special princess in your heart forever?", "honey, I want to have a castle with you,just you and me,will you want to be my prince? Those just don't ring true to me as the type of thing a genuine woman seeking lasting love would say to a seventy year old man she'd never met before, especially absent a photograph or any other identifying details.Chat pop-ups for "John" didn't start as immediately as for "Michael", but once they did (after about a day), they were similarly incessant, and equally implausible.All of the above points strongly to scamming - that deceptive letters are sent out without regard for any particular qualities of their recipients (other than having money to spend).A sample of some of the first few messages "Michael" received, along with my commentary, if any, in grey, follows.I did not take screenshots of any of these chat pop-ups, but you don't have to take them on faith - you can perform the same experiment that I did, and see for yourself that these are the sort of messages that you receive.Here is a sample of those quotes from those letters, including any of my comments in grey.

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That's not to say that the remaining 30% were not scammers, and, indeed, the style of their letters was very similar.

I also can't fail to mention that after the first photograph in each letter, it costs ten credits to open each photograph, and that, surprise, surprise, many (around 50%) of the letters "Michael" received contained more than one photograph.

To give you an idea of the frequency of the letters, around 60 letters arrived within the first nine days - about 6.5 letters per day.

Otherwise, read on for the build-up to that evidence. They never stopped, only increasing in frequency over the following few days.

The vast majority of the "women" (I quote that word only because it is entirely possible that behind any of these messages was a man) messaging "Michael" sported profile pictures that looked professionally photographed, and most of the ladies could even have passed for professional models - in all likelihood, many if not most of these images were of professional models.

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